Sexistentialism

Queer Theory is Sexy

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All our silences in the face of racist assault are acts of complicity.
bell hooks, killing rage: ending racism (via grrlyman)

I would add this is doubly so for white people since speaking up doesn’t endanger us in the way that it might for PoC.

(Source: deviantfemme, via rileykonor)

Filed under bell hooks

27,724 notes

If you blame Native American communities for their poverty, remember that the entire continent was stolen from them.

If you blame Black American communities for their relative poverty, remember that Black Americans were stolen from a continent, trafficked, and enslaved for nearly 300 years.

Tell me again about how your family ‘started from nothing’ when they immigrated. Didn’t they start from whiteness? Seems like a pretty good start.

The American Dream required dual genocides, but tell me again about fairness and equal opportunity. Tell me about democracy, modeled after the Iroquois Confederacy. Tell me your proud heritage, and I will show you the violence that made it so.

Kim Katrin Crosby (via xuron)

Keynote Speaker for LGBTQ History Month at Dartmouth, on September 30, 2013, where quote is from.

Important. Especially the phrase “dual genocides.” Because clearly using Black bodies as tools to rebuild stolen and settled land from Native people who are dehumanized and killed via genocide as rationalized by the State makes the relationship between dehumanized stolen bodies without structural power on stolen land a different one from White bodies with structural power occupying land that is not theirs.

(via gradientlair)

(Source: biggreenmicroaggressions, via friendscallmetonks)

14 notes

Do any of my followers have useful perspectives or resources on white academics' use of terms such as "chican@" or "latin@"?

flwrpwrviolence:

queertheoryissexy:

queertheoryissexy:

Basically I am interested in the politics of this, as I find the practice very interesting. I have seen the term for some years now and it seemed very intuitive for me as a way to play with language to be inclusive and political. I have a lot of…

White academic in a chican@ studies course here.
I don’t really think it’s (mal)appropriative to use the term as long as you apply it correctly.
I wouldn’t use the @ where cishet is being represented. Like for example, there is a huge Chicana resistance to the politics of the “Chicano rights movement” because of patriarchy and heternationalism. You wouldn’t refer to a cishet Chicano activist from the 1960s a “Chican@” even if you want to adopt queer pronouns.
Similarly, Chicana/o/@ is a politicized/reclaiming term which not all Latina/o/@ people use, so you wouldn’t assign Chicana/o/@ identity to someone who wouldn’t use it themselves (like you said).
Furthermore, Chican@ doesn’t have like, a queer imperative. Like, I am reading a lot of work by Chicana lesbians who write extensively on queer issues and don’t make use of the @ symbol (Cherrie Moraga, Gloria Anzaldua, Emma Perez). Rather, they are using a more feminist deployment of the feminine Chicana.

Given the intersectional gendered and racialized nature of the term, I would say that if you are paying attention to the way Chican@ scholars use it, you can learn how to successfully deploy it.

Another thing to keep in mind is the changing of terms around queer chican@ people. For example, there is an emergent study Chican@ queer and trans people which utilizes the vocabulary of “joteria.”

TL;DR: It’s complicated. Have faith in yourself as a queer, anti-racist scholar and your ability to internalize what you learn from scholars of different social locations.

Thank you very much for your input!

Filed under flwpwrviolence chican@

1,840 notes

anarcho-queer:

thinksquad:

Los Angeles police officers tampered with voice recording equipment in dozens of patrol cars in an effort to avoid being monitored while on duty
An inspection by Los Angeles Police Department investigators found about half of the estimated 80 cars in one South L.A. patrol division were missing antennas, which help capture what officers say in the field. The antennas in at least 10 more cars in nearby divisions had also been removed.
http://articles.latimes.com/2014/apr/07/local/la-me-lapd-tamper-20140408

“LAPD Chief Charlie Beck and other top officials learned of the problem last summer but chose not to investigate which officers were responsible.”

anarcho-queer:

thinksquad:

Los Angeles police officers tampered with voice recording equipment in dozens of patrol cars in an effort to avoid being monitored while on duty

An inspection by Los Angeles Police Department investigators found about half of the estimated 80 cars in one South L.A. patrol division were missing antennas, which help capture what officers say in the field. The antennas in at least 10 more cars in nearby divisions had also been removed.

http://articles.latimes.com/2014/apr/07/local/la-me-lapd-tamper-20140408

LAPD Chief Charlie Beck and other top officials learned of the problem last summer but chose not to investigate which officers were responsible.

(via siliconandsunlight)

Filed under police lapd injustice

14 notes

Do any of my followers have useful perspectives or resources on white academics’ use of terms such as “chican@” or “latin@”?

queertheoryissexy:

queertheoryissexy:

Basically I am interested in the politics of this, as I find the practice very interesting. I have seen the term for some years now and it seemed very intuitive for me as a way to play with language to be inclusive and political. I have a lot of friends who use the term. But I am only now getting into the vast field of Chican@ studies and I haven’t found any white academics who use the term, and I’m wondering if there is a reason for that.

I understand the term to be a matter of reclamation and forging an identity against colonization, and so I would understand how the use of the term by a white academic would be inappropriate. Sandra K. Soto’s explanation of the term in her book Reading Chican@ Like a Queer: The De-Mastery of Desire made a lot of sense to me, and the performative notions invoked by her use of language actually resonated with my own formulation of tr-ns coalitional politics. But performative acts depend on the cite of enunciation, and I am not sure a white academic using the term has the same effect. On the contrary, it seems like there could be serious problems with use and misuse of the term.

As I understand it, Spanish grammar allows for plural nouns such as “Chicanos” to refer to male and females rather than males exclusively. So there is no technical (or grammatical) need for a white academic to use the term—the term is not technically inclusive but politically so. That is my understanding at least. As such, and as I understand it, Chican@ should be understood as a political act and shouldn’t merely be used to refer to men and women of Mexican descent/ancestry/culture. So my question is, do white academics have any reason to undertake that political act, or should they rather refer to “Chicanos” when they want to talk about the general population, including people of all genders?

In short, who can undertake this performative, political act, and who should (or shouldn’t)?

Full disclosure: I am a white academic and I am writing an analytical paper on Tomás Almaguer’s study of Chicano male homosexual identity, for a professor who I doubt is as critical of these issues of language as I am. I want to make sure that I am sending the right message with the language I use. However, I’m also interested in the question in its own right. I would be fine with a cis person using my terminology of “tr-ns”, as it would performatively signal their openness to my own experience and their own lack of knowledge about it (it would also depend on the person and their ethical commitment to the ideals signaled by the linguistic practice). But Chican@ doesn’t necessarily function in this way, despite its similarities. I’m interested in the performative function of the term and why or why not white academics have a place using it.

Reblogging because I posted this late last night and it didn’t get a lot of attention.

281 notes

We’ve extended our search for a transgender contributer

bisexual-books:

We’re looking for another contributer to join us here at Bisexual Books! 

When Ellie and Sarah started this blog a year ago we had no idea if anyone would even care about bisexuality in literature.  Well, besides us.  We were grateful to bring on Evan last fall but we still want to expand!

Sadly we can’t pay you.  This is a labor of love.   However, you’ll be joining three kick-ass bisexuals who are passionate about the power of stories and information to improve the lives of real people.

Now down to business.   

We feel like we’ve got this cis thing covered, so we’re looking for a transgender bisexual to join our motley crew.   We’re using transgender as an umbrella term here so as long as you identify as trans in some way, that is good enough for us.  

 What else are we looking for? You must:

  • Be a reader, i.e. you must read a lot.  You self-define what this means.
  • Have the time to put up one review or analysis of at least 3 paragraphs once a week or more
  • Have time to add cool things of interest to the queue a couple times a week
  • Speak and write in fluent English
  • Be over 18 (since we review erotica here)

Some things would be neat but not required:

  • If you regularly read adult fiction (especially science fiction, fantasy, and literary fiction)
  • If you read in another language than English
  • Members of historically disadvantaged communities encouraged

Interested parties should email us at bisexualbooks@gmail.com  Tell us a little bit about yourself including your age, location, and preferred pronouns along with a writing sample.   This could be a review of a book, or an analysis of something relating to bisexuality.  Anything you’d like.  We want something that tells us who you are and why you are awesome :)

New deadline is April 30th.  

Please help us share this as widely as you can

(via queerbookclub)

Filed under signal boost